Design Patterns For Dummies

edited April 2008 in Books
This book is excellent. Very simple to understand, short and concise examples, and the author uses humor to illistrate the design patterns. All major design patterns are discussed and the author suggests when to use a pattern and under what conditions. This book shows you how (and when) to use the famous patterns developed by the "Gang of Four," plus some new ones, all designed to make your programming life easier. You can preview this book online at safari books:

http://safari.oreilly.com/9780471798545

Design Patterns For Dummies®
by Steve Holzner PhD
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Pub Date: May 08, 2006
Print ISBN-10: 0-471-79854-1
Print ISBN-13: 978-0-471-79854-5

Comments

  • edited April 2008
    Table of Contents of Design Patterns for Dummies

    Copyright
    About the Author
    Author's Acknowledgments
    Publisher's Acknowledgments
    Introduction
    About This Book
    Foolish Assumptions
    Conventions Used in This Book
    How This Book Is Organized
    Icons Used in This Book
    Where to Go from Here
    Part I: Getting to Know Patterns
    Chapter 1. Congratulations, Your Problem Has Already Been Solved
    Just Find the Pattern that Fits
    Enter the Gang of Four Book
    Getting Started: The Mediator Pattern
    Adapting to the Adapter Pattern
    Standing In for Other Objects with the Proxy Pattern
    Taking a Look at the Observer Pattern
    Chapter 2. Putting Plans into Action with the Strategy Pattern
    Extending Object-Oriented Programming
    Handling Change with "has-a" Instead of "is-a"
    Drawing Up Your Plans
    Making Your Move with the Strategy Pattern
    Chapter 3. Creating and Extending Objects with the Decorator and Factory Patterns
    Closed for Modification, Open for Extension
    Enter the Decorator Pattern
    Putting the Decorator Pattern to Work
    Improving the New Operator with the Factory Pattern
    Building Your First Factory
    Creating a Factory the GoF Way
    Chapter 4. Watch What's Going On with the Observer and Chain of Responsibility Patterns
    Notifying Observers with the Observer Pattern
    Using Java's Observer Interface and Observable Class
    Using the Chain of Responsibility Pattern
    Chapter 5. From One to Many: The Singleton and Flyweight Patterns
    Instantiating Just One Object with the Singleton Pattern
    The Flyweight Pattern Makes One Look like Many
    Part II: Becoming an OOP Master
    Chapter 6. Fitting Round Pegs into Square Holes with the Adapter and Facade Patterns
    The Adapter Scenario
    Fixing Connection Problems with Adapters
    Simplifying Life with Facades
    Chapter 7. Mass Producing Objects with the Template Method and Builder Patterns
    Creating the First Robot
    Creating Robots with the Template Method Pattern
    Building Robots with the Builder Pattern
    Chapter 8. Handling Collections with the Iterator and Composite Patterns
    Accessing Objects with the Iterator Pattern
    Putting Together Composites
    Tracking the Composite Pattern in the Wild
    Chapter 9. Getting Control of Your Objects with the State and Proxy Patterns
    Getting the State of Your Union with the State Pattern
    Standing In for Other Objects with Proxies
    Chapter 10. Coordinating Your Objects with the Command and Mediator Patterns
    Taking Command with the Command Pattern
    Coordinating with the Mediator Pattern
    Part III: The Part of Tens
    Chapter 11. Ten More Design Patterns
    Creating a Factory Factory: The Abstract Factory Pattern
    Cloning when You Need It: The Prototype Pattern
    Decoupling Abstractions from Implementations with the Bridge Pattern
    Creating Your Own Language: The Interpreter Pattern
    Forget Me Not: The Memento Pattern
    The Visitor Stops In for a Moment
    Going in Circles with Circular Buffers
    Doing Your Magic Off-Screen with the Double Buffer Pattern
    Getting Multiple-Use Objects Out of the Recycle Bin Design Pattern
    Entering the Big Time with the Model/View/Controller Pattern
    Chapter 12. Ten Easy Steps to Create Your Own Patterns
    Following the Pattern Catalog Style
    Introducing the Veto Pattern
    Getting Your Pattern into a Pattern Catalog
    Design Patterns For Dummies®
    The 23 Gang of Four Design Patterns

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